Early detection of changing ecosystems is aim of Nebraska-led research

October 2, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — In medicine, the ability to screen for diseases before they wreak havoc on the human body has been revolutionary. Tests like colonoscopies and mammograms detect health problems before a patient has symptoms – and while there is still time to reverse course.

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Nebraska biochemist explores role of proteins in health

September 3, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — An estimated 42 million protein molecules per cell carry out many of the human body’s most critical functions: transporting oxygen, delivering intercellular messages and driving immune responses, for example. Each protein molecule contains one or more intricately folded chains of amino acids, which form a 3D shape that evolves to respond to the environment and meet the cell’s demands.

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Stalk-worn sensor to measure crops’ water use

July 31, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Wearable technology will soon move from wrist to stalk, swapping measures of blood flow and respiration for sap flow and transpiration.

Their design won’t have anyone confusing growing season with fashion season, but the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s James Schnable and Iowa State University colleagues are developing a Fitbit-like sensor to be worn by corn and other thick-stemmed crops.

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Angie Pannier
Pannier earns Presidential Early Career Award

July 5, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — University of Nebraska–Lincoln researcher Angie Pannier has received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

The award is the highest honor presented by the United States government to scientists and engineers who are in the beginning stages of their research careers. It is reserved for individuals who show exceptional promise for leadership in science and technology fields.

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Dean Tala Awada speaking in front of multimedia displays
Ag Research Division co-hosts national agroecosystem research meeting

June 12, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Scientists from across the country converged in Lincoln June 4-6 for the annual meeting of the Long-term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) Network. The meeting was co-hosted by the Agricultural Research Division (ARD) at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS). 

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microscopic view of bacteria
Research aims to prevent resistance to staph infection treatment

June 12, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Researchers at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln are working to halt resistance to an antibiotic used to treat serious staph infections in humans.

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a field of wildflowers
Study explores value of Nebraska’s roadside restoration efforts

May 8, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. —The idea of a road trip across Nebraska can be appealing for a number of reasons, including the beautiful grasses and wildflowers found along roadsides throughout the state. Much of that vegetation has come from the revegetation practices of the Nebraska Department of Transportation which has teamed up with researchers from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln to evaluate these efforts.

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Joe Louis
Study of sorghum-munching aphids earns NSF award

April 17, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — A tiny invader’s gooey march through U.S. sorghum fields continues to devastate crop yields, forcing some farmers out of the sorghum business despite the crop’s increasing importance.

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proso millet
Sequenced Genome of Ancient Crop Could Raise Yields

March 5, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — Humanity has finally gotten to know one of its oldest, hardiest crops on a genetic level.

An international team has sequenced and mapped the genome of proso millet – a feat essential to raising yields of the drought-resistant crop in the Nebraska Panhandle and semiarid regions where population booms foreshadow food shortages.

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Joe Louis with a collection of leaves infested by corn-leaf aphids.
Experiments underscore overlooked aspect of defending corn from pest

February 27, 2019

Lincoln, Neb. — A chemical compound typically cast as a supporting actor in corn’s defense against a tiny pest might instead take a leading role, says a research-based rewrite from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. 

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